IN THE AKC REPORT ON THE BOTTOM YOU WILL SEE WHERE MILEEN OWNS 68 DOGS.. IN ORDER TO HAVE 68 DOGS IN A HOUSE OR BUILDING THEY MUST BE  A KENNEL SETTING USE CAGES OR IN A STACK CAGES, . YES AKC ALLOWS BREEDERS TO USE CAGES TO KEEP THEIR DOGS IN...

the photos of the stack cages and kennel are examples.. nothing more

 

IN ORDER FOR ONE OR TWO PEOPLE TO TAKE CARE OF 68 DOGS THEY WOULD NEED TO USE CAGES THERE WOULD BE NO WAY ONE OR TWO PEOPLE COULD CLEAN UP AFTER THEM ALL EVERY DAY IF THEY WERE ON THE GROUND..

 

LETS SEE HOW MUCH TIME THEY WOULD HAVE PER DOG.. IF YOU HAVE 68DOGS AND YOUR SPEND 24 HOURS A DAY IT WOULD BE .3529 OF AN HOUR   PER DOG TO CLEAN UP AFTER. THERE IS NO WAY POSSIBLE..

 

IN MY OPINION ONLY I DON'T THINK DOGS SHOULD HAVE TO LIVE IN CAGES ON WIRE MOST OF THEIR LIFE..

 

 

THERE ARE 4 AREAS THE AKC LOOKS AT WHEN THEY DO AN INSPECTION.

1. MUST HAVE A RECORD FOR ALL DOGS

2. MUST IDENTIFY ALL DOGS TO THEIR RECORD

3. MUST HAVE LITTER RECORDS FOR ALL DOGS

4. MUST MEET THE AKC CARE STANDARD--

which is just like the USDA care standard for animals

 

This was taken from the AKC webiste

Deficiencies in the Care and Condition of Dogs
When in the course of routine on-site records inspections, AKC Inspectors discover dogs in a clearly compromised condition (including, but not limited to, dogs that are grossly underweight, severely dehydrated, with serious untreated injuries or having severe external parasitic infestation), AKC Investigators may then initiate referral of AKC privileges for conduct prejudicial to the best interests of purebred dogs. (A referral places an administrative hold on an individual's AKC registration privileges.) The referral process shall include provisions for offenders to be timely notified, in writing, of specific deficiencies, as well as minimum acceptable actions required to correct each deficiency. (See attached guidelines.) Offenders shall be given 45 days to correct deficiencies with the possibility of ending the referral by request and passing a complete reinspection.

In cases where deficiencies are not corrected or re-inspections are not requested, the AKC may proceed with disciplinary action leading to suspension of all AKC privileges. When suspensions occur, agencies shall be notified by AKC (and whenever, during the above process, dogs are found in conditions that place them in immediate danger, agencies with jurisdiction shall be notified at once).

Note: These guidelines (adapted from drafts produced by Investigations and Inspections) are intended to help individuals correct deficiencies that have triggered notification of animal care agencies under current AKC policy and/or to help those people whose AKC registration privileges have been placed on referral because of such deficiencies. They are not meant to serve as minimum standards for breeding facilities, but rather as a basis for helping individuals correct specific deficiencies found during routine inspections.

A. Kennel Conditions (Housing)
        1. The shelter must be large enough so the dogs can sit, stand, lie down or turn around comfortably, with no overcrowding.
        2. The shelter shall be constructed and maintained so that dogs are securely confined and the shelter does not cause injury to the dogs.
        3. Protection from adverse weather conditions must be provided.
        4. Dogs must have access to daily exercise.
        5. If wire is used, it must be an appropriate size for the breed to prevent injury, especially to feet.

B. Kennel Conditions (General)
        1. Dogs should have access to fresh water on a daily basis.
        2. Dog food should be fresh and appropriate.
        3. Feces should be picked up and disposed of as frequently as necessary so as to not pose a threat to the health of the dogs.
        4. Dogs should have access to a play area on a daily basis.

C. Deficiencies in the Condition of Dogs
        1. Dogs at immediate risk.
        2. Grossly underweight dogs.
        3. Serious wounds that require veterinary care, but appear untreated.
        4. Obvious, severe external parasitic infestation.
        5. Collars that are too tight.
        6. Severe skin lesions.