Shorkie puppies for sale. puppy, breeders, shorkie breeder !

 
 IT IS THE JOB OF RESPONSIBLE BREEDERS TO MAKE SURE THAT THE BABIES THEY HELP PRODUCE ARE IN THE BEST OF HEALTH. ONE OF THE WAY'S THEY CAN DO THIS IS TO DO THE TESTING THAT IS RECOMMENDED ON THEIR ADULTS BEFORE BREEDING THEM.
 
I HAVE TO SAY IT IS VERY SCARY THAT A BREEDER OF YORKIE'S, SHIH TZU'S AND SHORKIES WOULD NOT TEST THEIR DOGS FOR GENETIC FAULTS!!!
 
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION IS ON  MILEEN'S WEBSITE
 
 
A Hybrid puppy is less likely to  inherit any genetic disease,
 
because there is no inbreeding. 
 
Both Parents need to have the hereditary gene to pass on any disease to the Hybrid puppy. This is very unlikely because of the widened gene pool, with cross breeding only F1, first Generation Dogs. The Hybrid dogs don't need to be bred. The puppies health is in no danger, but the offspring could be.
 
 

PLEASE NOTE:
 The Shih Tzu and Yorkie Breed have several health issues that run in BOTH their breeds. So any one of these's health issues can be in a Shorkie weather it be a F1 F2 or a F3
 
Here is a list of a few issues:
 
Liver  (Yorkie click here) (Shih Tzu click here)
Kidney (Yorkie click here) (Shih Tzu click here)
Heart (Yorkie  Click here) (Shih Tuz click here)
Eye (Yorkie click here) (Shih Tzu click here)
 
Even if you believe Mileen Coulters point of view. She states on her fancypoo4u.com website breeds purebreds which are not mixes.  So why are her purebreds not already genetically tested???
 
MILEEN  SAYS ON HER SITE: No OFA or cerf testing or screening to be done on either of these breeds.  

THIS IS A LIE!!!

Eye Care for Animals

11950 West 110th Street Suite A

Overland Park, KS 66210

(913)-381-3937

 

 

BY HER POSTING THIS AND THE OTHER INFORMATION ON HER GENETIC TESTING PAGE WE KNOW SHE DOSE NOT DO ANY TYPE OF TESTING ON HER MOM'S AND DADS.  WHICH IS FINE, BUT DON'T TELL PUPPY PARENTS THAT THE TESTING IS NOT THERE, EVERY ONE IS ENTITLED TO THEIR OWN BELIEVES AND THEIR OWN BREEDING PROGRAM BUT WHEN YOU ARE TELLING LIES TO SALE YOUR DOGS THAT IS WRONG..

 

 

 
DOSE YOUR BREEDER BELIEVE IN HYBRID VIGOR??

Because of genetics, no dog regardless of breed or cross is safe from inherited health issues. A big myth that many less than ethical breeders of both purebreds and designer mutts will use is that their dogs are genetically free of all health issues.  (Please for more on this topic, read reknowned canine geneticist Dr. George Padgett's article in Dog World from January of 1997 where he discusses the over 102 genetic issues that cross bred dogs can have). Hybrid vigor does NOT exists in the crossbred dog or the world of domestic dogs regardless of what anyone states.

Well, first, many health issues have no genetic test - just screenings.  But even with this knowledge, a good breeder will screen potential breeding dogs.  Since there are many health problems that can be found in various and even all breeds, no breed or cross is safe from them.  It is up to the breeder to screen for what they can and have the dogs certified where applicable (such as OFA - Orthopedic Foundation of America). 

Please click on the breeds in the cross/designer mutt you are looking at. Compare the lists and you will get an idea of what the cross can inherit.  Please note that the lists of inheritable issues are not complete. Just the more common hereditary or possible hereditary health issues are listed. Also note, that some things most assume are not hereditary may actually have a hereditary basis like predisposition to ear infections and allergies or a predisposition to the often fatal problem of "bloat."  Hips dysplasia is found in all breeds of dog from tiny to giants.  It was discovered no longer to be a "big dog" problem. Even if it is not listed under the breed you are checking, please note that no breed or cross is immune from this hereditary issue. Any breeder should at least OFA or PennHip certify their dogs along with CERF and Thyroid.

This list will frequently be added to. Presently it is addressing the more common breeds seen in the designer mutt/poo-dog phenomenon. The breed list is more or less in alphabetical order - scroll down to find the breeds you need to know about.

Please note, these are just brief descriptions of some of the health issues

 

Epilepsy/Canine Seizure Disorder - Hip Dysplasia - Progressive Retinal Atrophy/Denegeration (PRA/PRD) - Temperaments - Allergies - Legg-Calves Perthe - Luxating Patellas - Hypothyroidism - Chryptochordism - Bloat

 

 

Mileen say's: There are no Genetic tests or Screening for hereditary diseases
 
This could NOT be more false:
Here is a list labs that do
 
DNA Testing

DNA testing based on identification of a specific gene mutation is 100% accurate for identification of animals that are clear of the disease (homozygous normal), carriers of the disease (phenotypically normal but heterozygous for normal and mutant alleles), or affected with the disease (homozygous for mutant alleles). Knowledge of the genotypic status is the breeder’s most powerful tool for elimination of a genetic disease. Breeding of genetically clear individuals will produce offspring that are all genetically and phenotypically normal. Breeding of a clear with a carrier will produce all phenotypically normal offspring but 50% of the offspring are expected to be genotypic carriers. In the rare incidence where desirable traits of an affected individual outweigh the undesirable genetic trait, an affected individual may be bred to a clear and the offspring will be all phenotypically normal but genotypic carriers. These offspring should later be bred only with clear individuals. DNA testing by linkage is not as straight forward as that for identification of a specific gene mutation and requires more explanation than this space allows, but it is more desirable than existing tests based on phenotypic evaluations of polygenic traits. The financial advantages of DNA testing and associated DNA profiling are clear. The test is accurate, can be done at an early age, only one test is required, and progeny can be cleared by parentage if DNA profiles are available for determination of parentage. OFA serves as the central repository of DNA test results from approved laboratories for purposes of monitoring the disease and as a source of information for breeders, breed clubs, owners, prospective owners, and researchers.

Laboratories Performing DNA-Based Disease Tests

Alfort School of Veterinary Medicine

CNM Project, Dr. Laurent Tiret

7 avenue du General de Gaulle

F-94704 Maisons-Alfort

CEDEX - FRANCE

Email: labo@labraodrcnm.com

Website: www.labradorcnm.com/pages/

site/0-frame_site.html

 

Health Gene

2175 Keele St.

Toronto, ON M6M 3Z4 Canada

Toll Free: 1-877-371-1551

www.healthgene.com

Email: info@healthgene.com

 

Mileen say:

with either the Shih tzu breed or the Yorkie Breed. www.vetgen.com

 

our response is yet they are on the OFA list for DNA TESTING
 

VetGen

3728 Plaza Drive, Suite One

Ann Arbor, MI 48108

Phone: (800) 483-8436

www.vetgen.com

 

Animal Health Trust

Genetics Department

Lanwades Park, Kentford, Newmarket

Suffolk, CB8 7UU, U.K.

Telephone: 08700 50 24 24

Fax: 08700 50 24 25

E-mail: dnatesting@aht.org.uk

 

OptiGen, LLC

Cornell Business & Technology Park

767 Warren Road, Ste 300,

Ithaca, NY 14850

Phone: 607-257-0301, Fax: 607-257-0353

Email: genetest@optigen.com

 

 

www.optigen.com

Dr. David Wenger

Dept of Neurology

Jefferson Medical College

1020 Locust St, 394

Philadelphia, PA 19107

Animal Molecular Genetics Lab

 

Univ of MO College of Vet Medicine

320 Connaway Hall

Columbia, MO 65211

HansenL@missouri.edu

www.CanineGeneticDiseases.net

 

 

 

 

Neurogenetics Laboratory

Attn: Dr. Bai Jin Zeng

NYU Medical Center

400 East 34th Street (Room RR210)

New York, NY 10016

Phone: 212-263-2943

fyfe@cvm.msu.edu

Dr. Patrick Venta, Norfolk/Norwich Terr.

Michigan State University

Laboratory of Comparative Medical

Genetics

2209 Biomedical Physical Sciences

East Lansing, MI 48824

Dr. John C. Fyfe, Curly Coated Retriever

517-355-6463 x1552

Mary Boudreaux, DVM, PhD

Dept of Pathobiology

166 Greene Hall

College of Veterinary Medicine

Auburn University, AL 36849

(334) 844-2692

www.vetmed.auburn.edu/index.pl/

clinical_pathology

Email: VCPL@vetmed.wsu.edu

PennGen Laboratories

3850 Spruce Street

Philadelphia, PA 19104-6010

Phone: (215) 898-3375

http://w3.vet.upenn.edu/research/

centers/penngen/

 

 

 

Washington State University–

Veterinary Clinical Pharmacology

Lab (WSU-VCPL)

PO Box 2280

Pullman, WA 99165-2280

Phone/FAX: 509-335-3745

www.vetmed.wsu.edu/depts-VCPL/test.asp

Cornell University Goldstein Molecular

and Genetics Laboratory

Richard E. Goldstein, DVM, DipACVIM,

DipECVIM-CA

Phone: 607-253-4480, Fax: 607-253-3534

E-mail: phpt@cornell.edu

www.vet.cornell.edu/faculty/Goldstein/

Veterinary Diagnostics Center

225 Corporate Court

Fairfield, OH 45014

Toll-Free: (800) 625-0874

www.vetdnacenter.com

Email: contact@vetdnacenter.com

 

 

 

Hip Dysplasia

Abnormal development or growth in the hip joint. Has both hereditary and environmental factors. Polygenetic trait with no genetic test as of now (however, there are screenings to help determine if breeding dogs are affected and to what severity). May or may not be apparent in younger dogs.  Dogs can get a preliminary hip reading but cannot be given a certification until at least 24 months of age. Once thought to be a large dog problem but has since been diagnosed in just about every breed regardless of size.  All dogs regardless of breed should be cleared through the OFA or PennHip prior to breeding.  

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Progressive retinal atrophy/degeneration

Hereditary blinding disorder that has been identified in almost every breed of dog. the retina basically degenerates and leads to blindness over time. It is a simple recessive trait. It may or may not be apparent in puppies. Some dogs do not show symptoms until they are adults. It can be diagnosed with an opthalmascopic exam.  Since this is a progressive problem with no genetic test as of now, just the screening, breeding dogs must be checked annually and the test results registered with the Canine Eye Registration Foundation (CERF) through Perdue University.

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Epilepsy

Seizures can be brought on by many things and can also be genetic. Until more is known about how it is inherited, relatives of affected dogs should have extreme caution used when considering for breeding. There are several types of seizures: RES (Reactive Epileptic Seizure) is in response to a stress; SES (Secondary) is a result of a brain abnormality; PES (primary) seem to be idiopathic (no known cause) and are considered hereditary. Onset of seizures is generally between one and five years of age. There is no test for CES.

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Poor temperaments

Temperament is a combination of heredity and what you do with it.  Dogs with a history of unsound temperaments may increase the chance of producing puppies with unsound temperaments. Final temperament also has influences in the nurturing given to the puppy as it grows. As with health issues, breeding for sound temperament in vital. 

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allergies

Yes, allergies can have a hereditary predisposition. Allergies can run in families of dogs just as they can in humans.  A good breeder will have an idea if there is a predisposition to allergies in their lines. Some allergies can be pretty benign while others could be fatal (like to vaccines or anesthesia).

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Legg-Calve-Perthes

Legg Calves Perthes Disease is a disease where the femoral head begins to die. It is unknown how the disease happens or mode of inheritance. It is most often seen in smaller breeds such as Toy and Miniature Poodles,Westies, etc. However, it can also occur in larger breeds.  One or both legs may be affected. This is most commonly seen in younger dogs that are still growing. 

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luxating patellas

Basically, the knee is not kept in proper position and can slip out. This was commonly thought to be a small dog issues but has been seen in larger dogs as well. This can be hereditary and depending on the severity, may require surgery to correct.

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hypothyroidism

Low thyroid levels and can be hereditary in nature.  Low thyroid can lead to various other issues.  There are multiple symptoms associated with hypothyroid and this problem can be detected with a blood test. Some dogs may screen fine when younger but develop it later in life. 

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cryptochordism

This is undescended testicles (can be single - monorchid). This can have a hereditary basis and if left untreated can lead to health issues down the road for the male.  Dogs that have a single undescended testicle may still be fertile but the problem can be passed on.  Again, if the testicles are left in the body, they can lead to complications. Dogs with this condition should be neutered and breeding lines evaluated.

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gastric torsion/bloat

This very serious issue can also have a hereditary predisposition. Bloat is a catchall term for a few conditions where for one reason or another (blockage, twist, etc.) gas cannot be expelled from the abdomen and the stomach and intestinal tissue can die causing serious complications and death. This is not just a large or deep chested breed problem as commonly thought. And it has been thought that there are hereditary predisposition in some dogs to this.

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Because of genetics, no dog regardless of breed or cross is safe from inherited health issues. A big myth that many less than ethical breeders of both purebreds and designer mutts will use is that their dogs are genetically free of all health issues.

 
 

 

 

 

 

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